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The church was consecrated in 1926. During World War II it functioned as a military hospital for the Nazi army...

Name: Cave Church
Category: Religious buildings
Location: 1114 Budapest, Szent Gellért rakpart 1.
Internet: http://www.sziklatemplom.hu

Cave Church
Cave Church


 

Good to know about the Cave Church

  • Pauline monks built this remarkable church inside Gellért Hill after a pilgrimage to Lourdes, France. The church was consecrated in 1926
  • During World War II it functioned as a military hospital for the Nazi army In an attempt to curb the power of the Catholic Church the secret police raided the church in 1951. The prior was murdered; the monks were imprisoned After the raid the church was sealed.
  • After the fall of communism the monks regained the temple and reopened it in 1989
  • They continue to use it for religious functions
  • The cave is also called St. Ivan's Cave after a hermit who had lived here and healed the sick with the area's thermal water. The same water supplies now the Gellért Bath

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The reformer, the moderate and conservative: three synagogues close to other in the 7th district of the city. There’s one in Kazinczy Street, another in Rumbach Sebestyén Street and the fifth biggest in the word is in Dohány Street, which contains a museum of Jewish history, too.

Name: The Jewish Monuments
Category: Religious buildings
Internet: http://www.mazsihisz.hu

Description

The reformer, the moderate and conservative: three synagogues close to other in the 7th district of the city. There’s one in Kazinczy Street, another in Rumbach Sebestyén Street and the fifth biggest in the word is in Dohány Street, which contains a museum of Jewish history, too.

Zsinagóga
Zsinagóga

 

Earlier Jewish merchants lived in Gozsdu courtyard which could luckily retain its former atmosphere. The Holocaust Memorial Centre in Páva Street is oneof the museums to deal solely with the Holocaust. The shoes made of cast iron between Széchenyi István Square and Kossuth Square on the Pest side of the Danube are an absurd and movingly beautiful sight. They commerorate those who were shot inti the Danube by the Arrow Cross.

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A buzz with pavement cafés, street artists, vendors, boutiques and nightclubs, the dowtown (belváros in Hungarian) or Inner City is the hub of Pest.

A buzz with pavement cafés, street artists, vendors, boutiques and nightclubs, the dowtown (belváros in Hungarian) or Inner City is the hub of Pest and, for tourists at least, the epicentre of what’s happening. Commerce and pleasure have been its lifeblood as long as Pest has existed, first as a medieval market town and later as the kernel of a city whose belle époque rivalled Vienna’s.

Since their fates diverged, the Belváros has lagged far behind Vienna’s Centrum in prosperity, but the gap is fast being narrowed, at least superficially. It’s now increasingly like any Western city in its consumer culture, but you can still get a sense of the old atmosphere, especially in the quieter backstreets south of Kossuth Lajos utca.

Pest

Pest, on the left bank of the Danube, also has many historic districts, resorts and famous sights. There are nine bridges spanning the Danube, the oldest being the Széchenyi Chain Bridge built in 1849.

Széchenyi Chain Bridge
Széchenyi Chain Bridge

 

Downtown - Pest The Downtown Parish Church on Március 15. tér was the city’s first church. Examples of all architectural styles, ranging from Romanesque to Classicist, blend into the interior of the church.

At 2 Dohány utca Europe’s largest synagogue is found, serving also as a concert hall of excellent acoustics. The Jewish Museum in the courtyard of the synagogue is a centre for Jewish studies.



The Hungarian National Museum (14-16 Múzeum körút) is the finest example of Hungarian Classicist architecture. In existence since 1846, it is the most significant public collection in Hungary, tracing the history of the Hungarian people from prehistoric times to the present day.

Hungarian National Museum
Hungarian National Museum

 

The Vásárcsarnok (Grand Market Hall, 1-3 Fővám körút) is striking in its architectural inventiveness.

The finest examples of Art Nouveau architecture in Hungary include the Museum of Applied Arts (33-37 Üllői út) with its wide selection of permanent and temporary exhibitions, the houses on Szervita tér (Pest town centre) and the building of the former Postal Savings Bank (4 Hold utca).

The Parliament (Kossuth Lajos tér) is the largest and the most lavishly decorated building in the country. Built between 1885 and 1902 by Imre Steindl, this exquisite edifice is 96-m high and 118-m wide, and has 10 courtyards, 29 staircases and 27 gates. Europe’s first area heating system was put in service in this building. Seat of the Hungarian Parliament and government offices, it provides a place of safety for the Holy Crown and the royal insignia. It is accessible only by guided tours in groups.

The neo-Renaissance St. Stephen’s Basilica (Bajcsy-Zsilinszky út), elevated to the rank of basilica minor, is the largest church in Budapest, and the second largest in Hungary. The right hand of St. Stephen, Hungary’s first king (970-1038), preserved intact for over 1,000 years, is the relic of the Chapel of the Holy Right. The tower balcony of the basilica offers a splendid uninterrupted panorama of the whole of the city.



It is worth taking a walk along the straight Andrássy út, a boulevard that is now a World Heritage site. It is lined with 19th- and 20th-century Eclectic-style palaces.

The State Opera House (22 Andrássy út), with its frescoed interior, seating an audience of 1,200, is a splendid work of by Miklós Ybl, Hungary’s most famous architect, and has been the centre of musical life in Hungary since 1864. There are guided tours.

State Opera House
State Opera House

 

After a stroll along Váci utca from Vörösmarty tér and a look at the splendid view of Várhegy from the embankment, the best way to appreciate the dowtown is by simply wandering around. People-watching and window-shopping are the most enjoyable activities, and though prices are above average for Budapest, any visitor should be able to afford to sample the cafés. Shops are another matter – there are few bargains – and nightclubs are a trap for the unwary, but there’s nothing to stop you from enjoying the cultural life, from performances by jazz musicians and violinists to world-class conductors and soloists.

This building is characterised by a Neo-classical doorway with six columns and it is located away from the street (Lajos Street), close to the Aquincum hotel and a block of high-rise type flats.

Name: Former Synagogue of Óbuda
Category: Religious buildings
Location: 1036 Budapest, Lajos utca 163.

Description

This building is characterised by a Neo-classical doorway with six columns and it is located away from the street (Lajos Street), close to the Aquincum hotel and a block of high-rise type flats. On the tympan look out for the tables of the Law. This ancient synagogue today belongs to Hungarian State television which uses it as a studio.



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In the Baroque style, the Parish Church of Óbuda was built for the Zichy family in the 18th Century.

Name: Parish church of Óbuda
Category: Religious buildings
Location: 1036 Budapest, Lajos utca 168.

Description

In the Baroque style, the Parish Church of Óbuda was built for the Zichy family in the 18th Century. On the façade, two niches hold the statues of Saint Sébastien and Saint Roch.



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